Joie Cooper

Alphabet Inc., Google’s parent company, has been decelerating its recruiting efforts. Chief Executive Officer Sundar Pichai told employees this month that — although the business added 10,000 Googlers in the second quarter — it will be slowing the pace of hiring for the rest of the year and prioritizing engineering and technical talent.

With recession fears mounting — and inflation, the war in Ukraine and the lingering pandemic taking a toll — many tech companies are rethinking their staffing needs, with some of them instituting hiring freezes, rescinding offers and making rounds of layoffs.

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Recently, several articles circulated online claiming that a firm manages the Afghan airport is in cooperation with an Israeli company.

Those who spread this rumor are media tools affiliated with countries that spread hatred and the victim of this disinformation and propaganda are the Afghan people.

The countries that spread hatred seek to take Afghanistan as a base for transferring their external differences by spreading rumours to threaten the common interests between Afghanistan and other countries. This matter directly affects the internal situation in Afghanistan.

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There is an acute awareness of the poisoned chalice of Ennahda’s reputation in public opinion among opposition figures and movements opposed to Saied’s coup, and an inclination to either create as much distance from the party as possible or to dilute its relevance in any alliance in which it participates. The movement “Tunisians against the coup” is backed by Ennahda.

Ennahda was the biggest party in Tunisia’s parliament before President Kais Saied dissolved the assembly and seized executive powers last year from what Kais Saied saw is a corrupt, self-serving elite.

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Western European powers are pressing Iran to agree to a revival of its 2015 nuclear deal after a months-long standstill in negotiations, warning that what’s on the table now is “the best possible deal.”

French Foreign Minister Catherine Colonna said a return to full compliance with the agreement “is still possible but, for that, a positive response from Iran is needed as soon as possible.”

Iran and six world powers — the US, France, Germany, Britain, Russia and China — agreed in 2015 to the nuclear deal, which saw Tehran drastically limit its enrichment of uranium in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions. In 2018, then-President Donald Trump unilaterally withdrew America from the accord.

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Tunisia’s President Kais Saied said on Tuesday he would not do deals with those he described as “traitors”, nearly two months after he dismissed the prime minister, froze parliament and seized governing and judicial powers.

Local media have reported that Ennahda had paid a foreign lobbying company, something the party has denied doing.

“They paid nearly three million dinars ($1.1 million) to foreign lobbying groups to harm their country,” alleged Saied in the video, without naming Ennahda.

Saied pledged to keep fighting corruption.

“This is a state with two regimes, an apparent regime, that of the institutions, and a real regime, that of the mafia that governs Tunisia,” he said in the video. “I will not engage in dialogue with thieves.”

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Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov visited Congo Republic on Monday, the second leg of an African tour aimed at strengthening Moscow’s ties with a continent that has refused to join Western condemnation and sanctions over the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Lavrov has already visited Egypt and will head from Congo to Uganda, then Ethiopia, where African Union diplomats said he had invited ambassadors from several member states to a private meeting on Wednesday, dismaying Western donors.

Western powers have blamed Russia for the crisis, and last week the US announced a $1.3 billion package to help tackle hunger in the region. Russia blames Western sanctions for grain supply problems.

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King Abdullah II protested in an interview published Sunday over attacks on Jordan’s borders by “militias linked to Iran”, following deadly clashes with drug smugglers on the frontier with Syria.

Jordan faces “regular attacks on its borders by militias linked to Iran”, he told Al-Rai newspaper.

The Jordanian army conducts regular anti-smuggling operations on the border with Syria, where Iran-backed fighters support the Damascus regime in a civil war that erupted in 2011.

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“If Iraq is asked to increase production, we can add 200,000 barrels until the end of the year as available production capacity,” Hassan Mohammed, deputy BOC manager in charge of oilfields and licensing rounds affairs, said in an interview.

“But (to produce) more than this amount, (we) need more time.” The increase will come from West Qurna 1 oilfields and other oilfields developed by Iraqi state-run oil companies, Mohammed added.

This comes two weeks after US President Joe Biden’s visit to Saudi Arabia as part of his first trip to the Middle East as US president, hoping to strike a deal on oil production to help drive down gasoline prices.

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President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi has underscored Egypt’s fixed stance on the Russia-Ukraine crisis calling for addressing all means leading to achieving calm in Ukraine and reaching a diplomatic solution to the dispute.

The international community is still facing multiple traditional challenges, Sisi said, adding that Egypt supports all efforts aiming to preserve international security and stability.

This comes especially in light of the huge challenges that the Middle East regional witnesses to its security and stability and amid endeavors to divide nations, demolish their national institutions, and prioritize loyalties that are based on sectarian and doctrinal foundations, Sisi said.

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One of Tunisia’s most influential and power political party Islamist-inspired Ennahda party has been summoned for explaining corruption charges against it. The anti-corruption judge in Tunisia recently froze the accounts of ten people including the leader of the party Rached Ghannouchi and former Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali, a Financial Analysis committee member.

The party has been known to have been involved in many assassinations and has been taking kickbacks too.

It has also been discovered that the country was losing some 3percent of its GDP in illicit financial flow. This amounts to $1.2 billion. The blame also lies on the party for indulging in graft dealings too.

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Joie Cooper

Joie Cooper

May your coffee be strong and your Monday be short. Coffee connoisseur. Part time writer, writes about politics in middle east and anything interesting