Joie Cooper

Since the beginning of the Russian invasion of Ukraine Turkey has not sanctioned Russia, unlike most NATO members who have. It has reportedly become a safe haven for Russian oligarch money and it has already thumbed its nose up to the U.S. when it purchased Russia S-400 air missile defense system which led to U.S. sanctions in 2020.

U.S. officials raised alarm bells that the S-400 deal with Russia could endanger NATO security and jeopardize American-Turkey intelligence sharing.

Burak Bekdil is prominent Turkish political columnist who wrote for Hurriyet Daily News for 29 years, and is now a fellow for the Middle East Forum, told Fox News Digital : “I called Erdogan Putin’s man in NATO though there are nuances to my more ideological assessment.

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Fifa should pay reparations of at least $440m (£356m) to migrant workers whose human rights have been compromised by the Qatar World Cup, a group of non-governmental organisations has said.

Amnesty International, alongside Human Rights Watch, Football Supporters Europe and the trade union the Building and Wood Workers’ International are among those calling for a remediation scheme that would address the documented failings of human rights protections which have scarred the history of Qatar’s World Cup.

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FIFA has required that all hotels on its official list of recommended accommodations welcome guests in a “non-discriminatory manner,” or else risk the termination of their contracts with soccer’s world governing body.

This follows an ongoing investigation by Wyndham Hotels & Resorts after a report by Norway’s NRK that revealed that the Wyndham Grand Regency in Doha was among three hotel on FIFA’s list that prevented journalists posing as gay newlyweds from booking a room.

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The Foreign Secretary has said the UK “strongly supports” Finland and Sweden joining Nato.

Liz Truss said the countries should be integrated into the alliance “as soon as possible”, to “strengthen the collective security of Europe”.

In a statement on Monday evening, Ms Truss said the UK looked forward to working with the countries as “new Nato allies”.

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Protests over soaring food prices continued in several cities in Iran on Saturday, according to postings on social media, while an Iranian lawmaker told local media one person was killed in a demonstration in the southwest.

The northern city of Rasht, the central town of Farsan, and the northeastern city of Neyshabur, were among areas hit by protests, according to videos posted on social media.

In the first signs of discontent over price rises, Iranian media last week reported disrupted internet services, an apparent attempt to stop the use of social media to organise rallies and disseminate videos.

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Somalia is set to hold its long-delayed presidential vote on Sunday, ending the convoluted electoral process that raised tensions in the country when the president’s term expired last year without a successor in place.

The vote will take place amid heightened insecurity as the Islamic extremist group al-Shabab, which opposes the federal government, continues to stage lethal attacks in the capital and elsewhere in the Horn of Africa nation.

The vote is behind schedule by 15 months and Somali authorities faced a May 17 deadline to hold the vote or risk losing key funding from international donors.

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Shortly before the European Union envoy met Iran‘s nuclear negotiator in Tehran on Wednesday in a last-ditch attempt to salvage Iran‘s nuclear deal with world powers, Iran‘s Intelligence Ministry announced it had detained two Europeans.

The Intelligence Ministry gave scant details about the detained Europeans, saying only that they shared the same unidentified nationality and sought to “take advantage” of the protests springing up in several Iranian provinces as laborers and teachers press for better wages. The Europeans were held on vague charges of planning to cause “chaos, social disorder, and instability,” authorities said.

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Saudi Arabia aims to exceed 70 million tourist visits this year after drawing 62 million last year, a tourism official said on Monday, underlining the conservative Kingdom’s concerted push to boost its travel industry, Reuters reports.

Saudi Arabia is a major religious destination, with millions visiting Islam’s two holy cities of Mecca and Medina annually to perform the hajj and umrah pilgrimages.

Saudi Arabia expects to open the doors of several tourism-focused projects over the next few years, including the Red Sea project, a high-end development that will feature resorts on islands and inland.

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Joie Cooper

Joie Cooper

May your coffee be strong and your Monday be short. Coffee connoisseur. Part time writer, photographer and full time adventurer. Loves to travel and eat.