Yemen´s Houthi rebels targeted Abha International Airport causing a civilian plane on fire

Reports said that firefighters made the burst under control. The initial reports offered no word on any possible casualties from the attack. At least two Airbus A320s flown by the Saudia, the kingdom´s flag carrier, were on the ground at Abha, according to the flight-tracking website FlightRadar24.com. Another Airbus A320 on the ground there belonged to low-cost carrier FlyADeal. Both airlines did not immediately respond to requests for comment. The Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen said in a statement that it will “hold the militia accountable in accordance with international humanitarian law,” referring to the Houthis.

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May your coffee be strong and your Monday be short. Coffee connoisseur. Part time writer, photographer and full time adventurer. Loves to travel and eat.

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Joie Cooper

Joie Cooper

May your coffee be strong and your Monday be short. Coffee connoisseur. Part time writer, photographer and full time adventurer. Loves to travel and eat.

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